THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

CORAL CATSHARK - Atelomycterus marmoratus

Coral Catshark Atelomycterus marmoratus

Coral Catshark Atelomycterus marmoratus

Photograph copyright Andy Murch all rights reserved.

View more Coral Catshark Images  in the Shark Pictures Database

Common Names: Coral Catshark

Latin Name: Atelomycterus marmoratus

Family: Scyliorhinidae

Identification: A very slender bodied shark. Head narrow. Dorsal fins much higher than anal fin. First dorsal origin over pectoral fin base. Indented terminal margin above sub-terminal notch on caudal fin.

Light grey/tan body with many diffused black, dark grey and white irregular round and elongated spots. Top of head from eyes to snout mostly light grey. All fin tips white margined with a black demarcation.
Teeth with large central pointed cusp. One to two much lower pointed cusps on each side. Greatly expanded anterior nasal flaps extend to mouth. Anterior and posterior labial furrows long. Posterior nasal furrows longer than anterior.

Size: Maximum length 70cm. 10-13cm at birth. Mature males 47-62cm. Mature females 49-57cm.

Habitat: Holes and crevices in coral reefs. Found on shallow reefs to at least 25m (personal observation from Malapascua, Philippines) but depth range unknown.

Abundance and distribution: A fairly common species in the Indo-West Pacific. Pakistan and India to southern China, Philippines, Indonesia and PNG.

Behavior: Nocturnal. Hides by day in holes and crevices on the reef. Diet consists of mollusks, crustaceans and small bony fishes.

Reproduction: Oviparous. Lays paired egg cases.

Conservation Status: Considered 'Near Threatened' by the IUCN. Although A. marmoratus is widespread through the Indo-West Pacific, habitat destruction within its range, and increasing fishing pressure are likely to represent significant threats. This species may be under threat from habitat destruction by dynamite fishing, especially in eastern Indonesia, e.g., Tanjung Luar in Lombok (W. White, personal observation), and also maybe by coral removal in some parts of the region for use as building materials, e.g., Candi Dasa in Bali. Fisheries catches appear to be only minor throughout this species distribution, for example, it represents a minor catch in artisanal fisheries in several eastern Indonesian localities (W. White pers. obs.), and although it is probably caught in fisheries in West Papua and other parts of its range, information is very sparse. This species is close to the criteria of Vulnerable A2d+3d+4d due to the high level of exploitation within its range, but is assessed as Near Threatened due to the lack of detailed species composition data for fisheries and extent of habitat destruction in this region.

Citation: White, W.T. (SSG Australia & Oceania Regional Workshop, March 2003) 2003. Atelomycterus marmoratus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>.

Photographs: Bugtong Batu Seamount, Malapascua Island, Philippines.

Similar species: The coral catshark was originally thought to inhabit Western Australia and the Northern Territory but sightings have now been attributed to the Australian Marbled Catshark Atelomycterus macleayi which has smaller black spots and subtle grey bands on a lighter grey/tan base.

Reaction to divers: Coral catsharks generally try to retreat into crevices when closely approached. Occasionally they may be encountered at night openly hunting on the reef. Some divers have managed to get good images of them in that environment.

Diving logistics: Coral catsharks can be encountered in a number of places throughout Southeast Asia. Sulawesi in Indonesia and the Philippines have proven to be fairly reliable.

I have had success on most dives at Bugtong Batu Seamount near Malapascua Island in the Philippines. Big Fish Expeditions runs yearly shark diving trips to Malapascua which is also the best place in the world to find Pelagic Thresher Sharks: http://bigfishexpeditions.com/Thresher_Shark_Diving_Malapascua.html

 

HOME     LINKS     TAXONOMY      UNDER THREAT     BOOKS     CONTACT

 

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada