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ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

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ROGER'S ROUNDRAY

Photograph copyright Andy Murch

View all available Rogers Roundray Pictures in the Shark Pictures Database

Common Names: Rogers Roundray, Roger's stingray, thorny roundray, lined roundray, thorny stingray, lined round stingray.

Latin Name: Urotrygon rogersi.

Family: Urotrygonidae

Identification: Disc rounded but angular with almost straight anterior margins terminating in a prominently pointed snout. Dorsum light brown to pink lightening towards disc margin. Scattering of irregular darker spots and blotches. A row of 30 tubercles along centre-line of back from behind eyes to tail sting. Caudal fin spatulate but narrow.

Size: Maximum disc width 46cm.

Habitat: Turbid, shallow sandy bays and continental shelf. Intertidal to at least 20m.

Abundance and distribution: Coastal Eastern Pacific from southern Baja to Ecuador. Ventures as far north as Southern California during periods of extremely warm weather.

Rogers roundray is an abundant inhabitant of the intertidal zone in Panama Bay.

Behavior: Forages over sand for small fish and crustaceans.

Reproduction: Ovoviviparous.

Photographs: Punta Chamé, Bay of Panama, Panama.

Similar species: The rogers round stingray shares its range with a number of very similar looking Urotrygon rays.

The spinytail roundray (Urotrygon aspidura) is very similar but has straight rear margins to its pelvic fins.

The Chilean roundray (Urotrygon chilensis) is virtually identical but usually has more spots forming a mottled pattern on its dorsum.

The Pygmy roundray (Urotrygon nana) has a subtle network of fine lines covering its dorsum.

The Round Stingray (Urobatis halleri) is usually heavily patterned but sometimes has a barely definable pattern over a network of fine light and dark spots.

Reaction to divers: Remains motionless under a fine covering of sand. May remain still even after sand has been fanned away but usually re-covers itself by undulating its disc. Will bolt if persistently molested.

Diving logistics: This species is abundant in the Bay of Panama but visibility in the surf zone makes diving with it almost impossible in most places. If fact, the entire Pacific Slope in Central America makes inshore diving or snorkeling very challenging. There is a protected beach on the north side of the Punta Chamé Peninsula that is relatively calm and clear in the dry season. Try beach snorkeling there at low tide.

Other diving locations submitted by readers:

References and further reading:

Smithsonian Field Station in Panama: http://biogeodb.stri.si.edu/sftep/taxon_option_main.php?id=44

 

Fishbase: http://www.fishbase.org/summary/speciessummary.php?id=13285

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