THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

SHORTTAIL STINGRAY

 

 

Photograph copyright Andy Murch

View all available shark and ray images in the Shark Pictures Database

Common Names: Shorttail stingray.

Latin Name: Dasyatis brevicaudata

Family: Dasyatidae

Identification: Rhomboid disc. Anterior disc margins almost straight with rounded tips. Dorsum smooth and dark brown to dark grey with a line of small white spots running down each side of body from level with the eyes towards the tail. Ventrum pale. Tail (usually with two stings) tapers quickly to a short thin whip. Tail shorter than disc with long ventral finfold.

Size: Maximum disc width 2m.

Habitat: Sand and rocky bottoms often near rocky reefs and continental drop offs. Intertidal to 476m. Observed mating in cave systems in New Zealand.

Abundance and distribution: East and South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. Reports from Thailand probably refer to the closely related Matsubara's Stingray (Dasyatis matsubarai) from Japan.

Behavior: Moves into shallow water at flood tide to feed. Feeds on bony fishes, bivalves, squid, and crustaceans.

Reproduction: Viviparous. In NZ males have been observed biting and holding onto the much larger females pectoral fin for hours at a time. During actual copulation the male flips upside down under the female and inserts one clasper. He then beats his pectoral fins up and down and in so doing moves his clasper in and out of the females cloaca. During maturation males have been observed nudging the female which may stimulate the birthing process. 

Observations:

Photographs: Roe Reef, Rottnest Island, Western Australia.

Similar species: Matsubara's Stingray (Dasyatis matsubarai) has a very similar appearance including the rows of white spots, but is only known from Japan and possibly Thailand.

Reaction to divers: The shorttail stingray moves away when approached but may ignore divers when concentrating on mating.

Diving logistics: Although I have seen Shorttail rays on almost every dive at Rottnest Island I found these big rays very unapproachable. A far better location to try would be the Poor Knights Marine Reserve off of New Zealand where hundreds of Shorttail stingrays Congregate to mate each summer.

Other diving locations submitted by readers:

References and further reading:

Reef Sharks and Rays of the World. Scott W. Michael. Sea Challengers.

Sharks and Rays - Elasmobranch Guide of the World. Ralf M. Hennemann. IKAN.

HOME     LINKS     TAXONOMY      UNDER THREAT     BOOKS     CONTACT

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada